Past Library Scholars Grant Recipients

2012-2013 recipients
2011-2012 recipients
2010-2011 recipients
2009-2010 recipients
2008-2009 recipients
2007-2008 recipients
2006-2007 recipients
2005-2006 recipients

2012-2013 recipients

Mita Choudhury, associate professor of English at Purdue Calumet, was awarded $5,000 to help support her research on 18th century British literature and culture emphasizing the concept of public space.

Catherine Dossin, assistant professor in the Department of Art and Design, was awarded $2,915 to help support her research on collecting data on American art and geopolitics in Western Europe from 1945-1970, and for the "The Triumph of Art" project.

Rebekah Klein-Pejšoviá, assistant professor of History, was awarded $5,000 to travel to the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research archives at the Center for Jewish History in New York City to support research on her project Across the Iron Curtain: Hungarian Jewish Refugees, 1945-1951.

Jonathan Swarts, associate professor of Political Science at Purdue North Central, was awarded $5000 to travel to the UK National Archives in June where he will conduct research for a manuscript project entitled Friends and Allies: The Greek Military Junta and the United States.

2011-2012 recipients

Lisa Banu, assistant professor of Design History, was awarded $3,000 to help support her research and book manuscript entitled, “Immigrants and Indigenous Innovation: Eliel Saarinen and Raymond Loewy Design America.”

Jennifer L. Foray, assistant professor of History, was awarded $5,000 to travel to two Dutch archives where she will conduct research for her manuscript project entitled “Imperial Aftershocks: the Legacies of Decolonization in the Netherlands.

Stacy E. Holden, associate professor of History, was awarded $5,000 to travel to various cities in Morocco and Paris, France to help support her research and teaching focus on the modern Middle East and North Africa.

2010-2011 recipients

Robin Adams, assistant professor in the department of Engineering Education, was awarded $5,000 for a project melding design thinking and evolution of design based on primary materials focused on the Apollo Lunar Module.

Ahmed Idrissi Alami, assistant professor in the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures, received $5,000 for an interdisciplinary research project on 19th century travel writing in Morocco, melding cultural geographical work with literary analysis.

Rebecca Bryant, assistant professor of dance, received $1,765 for a project requiring travel for in situ viewing of DVDs to explore improvisation.

Mohammed Errihani, assistant professor of linguistics/director of English Language Program at Purdue Calumet, was awarded $4,075 for a project related to governmental materials concerning language policies in contemporary Morocco.

Kendall Leon, assistant professor of English, received $2,752 for a multidisciplinary examination of Chicana ethnic identity and politics utilizing rhetorical analysis, focusing also on contemporary relevance.

Nadège Germina Veldwachter, assistant professor in the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures, was awarded $4,947 for melding Holocaust studies, history, and Francophone literary studies focusing on Caribbean victims of the Nazi during the French Vichy experience.

Jeffrey Turco, assistant professor in the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures, was awarded $5,000 for engaging in work which encompasses medieval studies, media studies, film studies, popular culture and appropriation of the past in East German culture.

2009-2010 recipients

H. Kory Cooper, assistant professor of anthropology, received $5,000 to conduct research in Canada (British and Northwest Territories). He will examine the adoption and use of native copper by hunter-gathers in Canada.

Maren Linett, associate professor of English, received $1,400 to conduct research in Texas. She will travel to the Ransom Humanities Research Center at the University of Texas in Austin to examine a holographic copy of Elizabeth Bowen’s novel The House in Paris, which contains author revisions.

Catherine Dossin, assistant professor of art history, received $4,700 to conduct research in Belgium on documents related to the history of the Cerde et Carre, a group of international artists based in Paris in the 1930s and to collect information on Michel Seuphor’s participation in the revival of geometric abstraction in the 1960s.

Dawn Marsh, assistant professor of history, received $5,000 to conduct research in Canada and the U.S. (Ontario, New Jersey and Oklahoma). She will continue her research exploring the experiences of indigenous Delaware-Lenape women who chose to remain in historic homelands after tribal communities were dispossessed of their lands.

2008-2009 recipients

Brent K. Jesiek, assistant professor of in the department of Engineering Education, Electrical and Computer Engineering, received $4,691 to travel to Minnesota, New Jersey, Missouri, and California. This travel will allow him to expand upon his well-recognized dissertation research on the historical development of computer engineering as a distinct academic discipline and professional specialty in the United States, from the origins of the field in the 1940s to the early 2000s.

Michael R. Johnston, assistant professor of English, received $5,000 to travel to the U.K. to support the final stages of research for his book entitled Compilatores generosi: The English Gentry and Romance in the Later Middle Ages, which looks at every surviving manuscript of romance from the period 1350–1500.

2007-2008 recipients

Alicia C. Decker, assistant professor of history, received $5,000 to travel to Uganda to access Idi Amin’s official decrees published for 1978 and/or 1979, housed only in the High Court of Uganda. Her research will focus on possible textual, legal, and ethnographic manipulation of the Amin regime’s maintenance of power.

Caroline E. Janney, assistant professor of history, was awarded $4,707.44 to visit archives in Washington D.C. Her research addresses the interdisciplinary area of social history, African-American and women’s history, and memory within political historical concerns. Her completed project will be included in the thirteen-volume Littlefield History of the Civil War Era, published by the University of North Carolina Press.

Yonsoo Kim, assistant professor in the department of Foreign Languages and Literature, received $5,000 to visit Las Huelgas in Burgos, Spain. His research examines medieval Spanish convent life with a focus on the 15th century nun Teresa de Cartagena.

Alfred J. Lopez, associate professor of English, received $5,000 to access primary sources in New York Public Library’s holdings and in the Archivo Historico Nacional in Madrid. His research will provide a significant appraisal of the great Cuban figure Jose Marti, and will culminate in the first major scholarly biography of this Cuban icon.

Erik S. Ohlander, assistant professor of religious studies at Purdue Fort Wayne, was awarded $3,571 to access Islamic medieval Arabic texts, available at Princeton University Library and the Library of Congress. These materials offer research insight as animating primary sources to demonstrate the diffusion of Sufi thought and life.

Yvonne M. Pitts, assistant professor of history, received $4,000 to examine the National Archives for materials relevant to her research on slaves, social history, inheritance, and property rights.

Dawn G. Marsh, assistant professor of history, received $2,500 to visit important county archives in Eastern Pennsylvania to enhance her research manuscript in women’s studies, women’s history, and ethnographic analysis.

2006-2007 recipients

Elena Benedicto, associate professor of English, received $3,515 to support ten days of research of early archival material at the Archivo de Indias in Sevilla, Spain. Her research will focus on the early Spanish contact with the indigenous populations on the Atlantic Coast of Nicaragua in order to assess patterns of language loss and language shift.

Angelica Duran, associate professor of English, was awarded $1,640 to conduct research at the National Steinbeck Center in Salinas, California and the John Steinbeck Collect at Stanford University. She will be accessing manuscripts, correspondence, and taped interviews for a Hispanoamerican project focusing on John Milton’s influence on nation and race/ethnicity in literature, including those found in John Steinbeck’s work.

John Sundquist, assistant professor of German and linguistics, received $3,932 to research the linguistic contact between Norwegian and German merchants from 1350 to 1550 at the Archiv der Bergenfahrerkompanie in Lubeck, Germany. The findings in these rare materials, some of which are the only collection in the world, will be reported an international conferences and will contribute to a book-length research project.

Juan Wang, assistant professor of history, was awarded $4,900 to investigate the role played by popular print culture in shaping Chinese political opinion in 1911, the year of the Republican Revolution. He will be examining four collections of significant tabloids in the pre-Revolution Collection at the Nanjing Municipal Library.

2005-2006 recipients

Darren Dochuck, assistant professor of history, was awarded $5,000 to support three weeks at the Bancroft Library at the University of California Berkeley, the Young Research Library at the University of California Los Angeles, and the Parson Library at Pepperdine University. On this trip he will gain access to personal papers of the California Republican Assembly, institutional records of key religious organizations, and personal papers of grassroots activists. His research looks at the Southwest post-World World II in terms of evangelicalism, entrepreneurialism, and the populist conservatism.

Michael Ryan, assistant professor of history, was awarded $5,000 to cover four weeks of study at Yale University’s Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library. This non-lending library provides approximately 330 medieval and early modern sources focusing on alchemy, astrology, and magic which is essential to his research on themes of astrology during the reign of the Crown of Aragon in late medieval Spain.

Jeremy Brooke Straughn, assistant professor of sociology, was awarded $2,500 to support his research project dealing with ideology in the East German socialist state. His funding will cover monthly visits to the University of Chicago libraries over an eight month period. The libraries provide the most extensive collection of official reports and primary documents related to his project titled “Living Socialism: Ideology, Social Change, and the Life Course in the (Former) German Democratic Republic”.

Alain Togbe, assistant professor of mathematics at Purdue North Central, received $1,800 for an intensive two week visit to consult published articles and books related to mathematical developments at the Bibliothèque scientifique at Laval University in Quebec, Canada. Access to this information will further his research on solving families of Diophantine equations in the field of Algebraic and computational Number Theory.

Barbra Wall, assistant professor of nursing, received $2,500 to support a trip to Texas to gather more information about the 1900 Galveston hurricane at the Rosenberg Library Galveston, Texas History Center, Center for American History at the University of Texas at Austin, New London Museum, Trinity Mother Frances Health System, and the Smith County Historical Society. She will have access to first-person accounts of the Galveston hurricane as well as letters, reminiscences, and original government documents. The access to this information will aid her research on the history of nursing during major disasters in the United States between 1870 and 1950.